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RAgainst Slavery

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Actor Rowing the Atlantic to Raise Awareness of Modern-Day Slavery To mark the United Nations' International Day for the Abolition of Slavery, young actor, Peter Gadiot, is crossing the Atlantic Ocean to highlight the problem of global slavery and human trafficking whilst attempting to break the cross-Atlantic rowing world record. East Grinstead, Sussex, UK – Actor, Peter Gadiot, is rowing the Atlantic to raise awareness of the problem of modern-day slavery. The crossing from La Gomera, Canary Isles to Antigua in the Caribbean is hoped to be completed in a record-breaking time of less than 33 days. The project also marks the United Nations' International Day for the Abolition of Slavery - 2 December - which falls during the final preparations for the crossing. The crew is scheduled for departure on Sunday, 6th December 2009. The 3,000-mile journey will be an enormous physical challenge, with all crew members rowing 2 hours on, 2 hours off, continuously for 24 hours a day – such that the boat will never stop moving throughout the entire crossing - in an effort to beat the current 33-day cross-Atlantic world record. The crew, who may have to row naked in order to prevent salt sores, will face blisters, temperamental weather and sharks, as well as no cooked food or toilet facilities. The crew of 10 was hand picked by the captain, Ian Couch, one of only three men in the world to have rowed both the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. "Having travelled to many countries across the world and seen, first hand, some of the effects of modern day slavery, I really wanted to do something big to raise awareness of this issue," says Peter who has named the project, "Rowing Against Slavery". Peter, who has no previous rowing experience, aims to increase awareness of the problem to help combat this pernicious and degrading crime. The campaign is in support of organisations that campaign against slavery and exploitation in all its forms