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David S. Burns

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@davidsburns
Location: CA US
Website: http://t.co/VjmFJed7ez
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Bio

David Burns is the Campus Emergency Manager for the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). David has 25+ years diverse experience in Emergency Management in the private and public sectors, including local, county, and state government. David recently worked on 2 projects: Completion of the FEMA/EMI "IS-100 Intro ICS course for Higher Education" ; and installation of an integrated, multi-modal Mass Notification System (MNS), merging independent hardware systems (outdoor sirens, SMS/text, cable TV, radio, etc.) using the Common Alerting Protocol (CAP). UCLA is one of the first campuses nationally to acquire such a system. David's current focus is on exercising emergency organizational staff, public policy development related to the Higher Education Act, crisis communications, use of social media and interagency coordination. Vice-Chair of the University & Colleges Committee (UCC) for IAEM and Chair of UCC Legislative Committee. David has 10 years experience as a first responder in Oakland, Ca., EMT/Paramedic and Director of Field Operations for 15 to 20 field units, dispatch, and fleet operations. 9 years Regional EMS Coordination. Expertise in medical/disaster operations, policy, and EMS provider contract oversight. Instructor for SEMS, NIMS, ICS, and EOC operations. Coordinated construction of EOC in 2000. Terrorism/WMD Instructor. Threat & Vulnerability Team participant (4 years). 5 years of federal grant administration experience through FEMA. In 2007, I earned the Certified Emergency Manager (CEM®) credential through the International Association of Emergency Managers (IAEM). I managed medical operations for 6 days at the Cypress Freeway collapse (1989 Loma Prieta "World Series" Quake), and experienced many major disasters over three decades. I have lost colleagues, friends, and co-workers to line-of-duty-death (LODD), suicide, and others making poor choices.